leave somebody out (of something)

leave somebody out (of something)
ˌleave sb/sth ˈout (of sth) derived
to not include or mention sb/sth in sth

Leave me out of this quarrel, please.

He hadn't been asked to the party and was feeling very left out.

She left out an ‘m’ in ‘accommodation’.

Main entry:leavederived

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • starve somebody out (of something) — ˌstarve sbˈout (of sth) derived to force sb to leave a particular building or area by not allowing them to get any food • If they won t come out, we ll starve them out! Main entry: ↑starvederived …   Useful english dictionary

  • turf somebody out (of something) — ˌturf sb ˈout (of sth) | ˌturf sb ˈoff (sth) derived (BrE, informal) to make sb leave a place, an organization, etc. Syn: throw out • …   Useful english dictionary

  • chuck somebody out (of something) — ˌchuck sb ˈoff (sth) | ˌchuck sb ˈout (of sth) derived (informal) to force sb to leave a place or a job • They got chucked off the bus. • You can t just chuck him out. Main entry …   Useful english dictionary

  • drum somebody out (of something) — ˌdrum sb ˈout (of sth) derived usually passive to force sb to leave an organization as a punishment for doing sth wrong • He was drummed out of the army. Main entry: ↑drumderived …   Useful english dictionary

  • flush somebody out (of something) — ˌflush sb/sth ˈout (of sth) | ˌflush sb/sthˈout derived to force a person or an animal to leave the place where they are hiding Main entry: ↑flushderived …   Useful english dictionary

  • hound somebody out (of something) — ˌhound sb ˈout (of sth) | ˈhound sb from sth derived usually passive to force sb to leave a job or a place, especially by making their life difficult and unpleasant • They were hounded out of the country. • He claims he has been hounded from his… …   Useful english dictionary

  • boot somebody out (of something) — ˌboot sbˈout (of sth) derived (informal) to force sb to leave a place or job Main entry: ↑bootderived …   Useful english dictionary

  • ease somebody out (of something) — ˌease sbˈout (of sth) derived to force sb to leave a job or position of authority, especially by making it difficult or unpleasant for them over a period of time Main entry: ↑easederived …   Useful english dictionary

  • kick somebody out (of something) — ˌkick sb ˈout (of sth) derived (informal) to make sb leave or go away (from somewhere) Main entry: ↑kickderived …   Useful english dictionary

  • turn somebody out from something — ˌturn sb ˈout (of/from sth) derived to force sb to leave a place Main entry: ↑turnderived …   Useful english dictionary

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